Gender in Agriculture Partnership

Transforming agriculture to empower women and deliver food, nutrition and income security

Listening to Women Fishers on the Sekong River

The accelerated economic development of landlocked Laos, combined with extreme climate variables, points to dramatic transformations in subsistence fisheries on its rivers. In the country’s first Fisheries Law, adopted in 2009, co-management of village fisheries is required as a way to promote sustainable development at a local level. The co-management model, however, does not stipulate participation by women fishers, important stakeholders who make up almost one-half of all Lao fishers and whose work contributes directly to family nutrition and well-being. Based on fieldwork conducted in fishing villages on the Sekong River in southern Laos in 2013, this paper takes an ecosystems approach to discuss how the country can build resilience and social cohesion into fisheries by incorporating women and their knowledge into village fishery management. In the process, the health of river ecosystems and food security will improve, while women fishers will acquire new skills to help them avoid ‘poverty traps.’

Download the paper Listening to Women Fishers on the Sekong River: Fostering Resilience in Village Fishery Co-Management here.

Photo Credit: FISHBIO [Fisheries Research, Monitoring and Conservation]


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FISHBIO [Fisheries Research, Monitoring and Conservation]